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Catherine Turocy, photo by Catherine Andrako 2015

Catherine Turocy, photo by Catherine Andrako 2015

NEA Project from 1982 now available to view online!

1982 8:42
choreography/performance Catherine Turocy
camera/direction Celia Ipiotis
narration Robert Einenkel
music Folies d’ Espagne by Marin Marais/Les Fetes Venitiennes by Andre Campra
music performance Sandra Miller flute/James Richman harpsichord/Sarah Cunningham viola da gamba

from “The Videodance Project: Volume One”
produced with partial support from the National Endowment for the Arts

 

Celia Ipiotos and Jeff Bush have been contributing to the NY dance scene with video coverage, creative projects, archive videos, etc., since the 1970’s. Please visit their award winning Eye on Dance

Dance of the Month on November 7, 2016 with Catherine Turocy at Mark Morris Dance Center, 3pm to 5pm

Dancing the Garden Path, a Cosmic Choreography will explore symbolic meaning behind geometry of court dances of the 18th century as well as period garden design. Turocy will use the La Gavotte de Roy as a springboard for embodying cosmological theory and will also look into La St. George, a contredanse which Turocy thinks was in  honor of the Chevalier de St. George. The purpose of the class is to grasp the intangible nature of the past in asking from a period perspective, “What were they thinking!”  All are welcome to attend, no previous baroque dance experience required.

Location and cost: Click here

About the Video (description credit, Barnard IMATS)

From Parquet to Parterre is a video lecture developed to enhance the Barnard College course, “The Golden Age of Versailles: an interdisciplinary course that focuses on the vibrant cultural life in and around the court of Versailles during the reign of Louis XIV (1661-1715). The course, taught in French by Laurie Postlewate of the Barnard French Department, features a number of digital components to emphasize the conversation at Versailles between multiple disciplines. “

 

“Parquet” refers to the patterned ballroom floor where complicated geometric dances were a part of an evening’s entertainment and “Parterre” is the distinct garden space designed with the same basis in geometrical forms.  Both were used in social intercourse in Baroque society. Catherine Turocy, Artistic Director of The New York Baroque Dance Company is the guest writer and narrator. She discusses the philosophical origins of art with its social and moral importance and demonstrates the reflection of these ideals in both dance and garden design. Through demonstrations by professional dancers of her company (Caroline Copeland and Olsi Gjeci) and student dancers from Barnard, Ms. Turocy examines connections between the geometry used in 17th/18th century choreography with configurations of garden design by André Le Nôtre.  She discusses the philosophical origins of art with its social and moral importance, and reveals how both dance and garden design reflect these ideals. The video concludes with a momentous event in our own time, a look at the 2015 installation of the fountains at The Water Theatre Grove in Versailles by sculptor Jean-Michel Othoniel. One begins to understand how these designs are still of primary interest today.

 

From Parquet to Parterre  is the first in a series of video projects to be developed for “The Golden Age of Versailles” by Laurie Postlewate and Barnard’s IMATS (Instructional Media and Technology Services) with funding from COOL, the Committee for Online and On-Campus Learning, at Barnard College. This video is available for educational and noncommercial use, with attribution. (Catherine Turocy and Barnard College, 2015) Please email cturocy@gmail.com for more information on other videos and lectures of The New York Baroque Dance Company.  For a complete listing of video credits please refer to the final minutes at the end of the video.

 

October 3, 2015 Dance of the Month with Caroline Copeland at MMDC

October 9, 2015 at King Manor, 6:30pm: An Evening at Home with our Founding Fathers. Location: King Manor Museum, 150-03 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, NY(a short walk from the last stop on the E train – Directions: http://www.kingmanor.org/visit/directions.phpCaroline Copeland, Associate Director of NYBDC, working with NYBDC dancer Matthew Ting, has devised an entertaining dance/drama for this special concert with musicians Dongsok Shin, fortepiano & Leah Gale Nelson, violin. Reading letters from the period and singing songs of early America, Grant Herreid will be joining them in the intimate setting of the Dining Room at the Rufus King family estate.  For Tickets: $40 at the door. Advance purchase recommended. Seating is limited. more info: Click Here

November 6-9 at Haymarket Opera in Chicago:  Amadigi di Gaula by George Frederick Handel.  Sarah Edgar, Associate Director of the NYBDC, is the stage director and choreographer for this inventive production of one of Handel’s “magic” operas fully staged with new costumes and sets. Do not miss this exciting production with period instruments conducted by Craig Trompeter.  For Tickets and more information: http://haymarketopera.org/events.html

November 07, 2015  Dance of the Month with Catherine Turocy: Dancing the Garden Path,  dance notations which correspond to 18th century parterre designs will be the basis for the lesson.  Held at the Mark Morris Dance Center in Brooklyn.

November 11-13 at BAM: You Us We All   Seth Williams, advisor and former dancer/teacher of the NYBDC, is the choreographer for this new opera making its US premiere at BAM Harvey Theater. Part of 2015 Next Wave FestivalShara Worden is the composer, Andrew Ondrejcak is the librettist, designer and stage director and the music is played by B.O.X. (Baroque Orchestration X). For Tickets and more information: Click!

November 14, 8pm with The Dallas Bach Society: A Tale of Two Cities: Music in Paris and London. Catherine Turocy, Director of the NYBDC, with dancers Brynt Beitman, Carly Fox Horton, Alexis Silver and Andrew Trego with a guest appearance of members of the Contemporary Ballet Dallas directed by Valerie Shelton Tabor will join the Dallas Bach Society in music and dance of the 17th and 18th centuries, including music by Handel, Purcell, Lully and Campra for both the ballroom and theater. Location: SMU Meadow School of the Arts, Caruth Auditorium – 6101 Bishop, Dallas TX 75205. For Tickets and more information: Dallas Bach Society

November 20, 7:30pm with Ars Lyrica Houston, Hommage to the Sun King. Catherine Turocy and members of the NYBDC, Brynt Beitman, Carly Fox Horton, Alexis Silver and Andrew Trego celebrate Louis XIV’s 300th anniversary with music and dance in this special “Hommage to the Sun King.” Turocy provides the semi-staging and choreography for Marc Antoine Charpentier’s Les Arts Florissants in a period instrument performance conducted by Matthew Dirst. Location: Zilkha Hall, Hobby Center in Houston  Plan your visit  For Tickets and more information: Please click!

Saturday November 21st, Mainstage 2, Off Broadway Theatre, New Haven, CT. Caroline Copeland performs with Cantata Profana

“From the frou-frou of Poulenc’s raucous and irreverant Bal Masqué to the tristesse of Louis-Nicolas Clerambault’s savagely dramatic solo cantata Médée, CP takes to its feet for a rousing celebration of the great French esprit, joined by the uniquely stunning baroque and modern dance soloist Caroline Copeland. Our first dance collaboration!”
Sunday  November 22nd, REPEAT PERFORMANCE OF ABOVE at Dixon Place, NYC
December 05, 2015  Dance of the Month with Meggi Sweeney Smith
 
January 9, 2016, Dance of the Month with Meggi Sweeney Smith, Bourree
Saturday, February 06, 2016  Dance of the Month with Catherine Turocy, How to Dance Like Moliere at Mardi Gras, with music from Lully
February 12, 2016 at 8pm, FREE ADMISSION, Second Presbyterian Church, West 96th Street at Central Park West in NYC, The Stony Brook Opera Workshop joins with the Stony Brook Baroque Players to present a staged production of Handel’s little-known jewel O Come Chiare e Belle with stage direction by Catherine Turocy for three singers and small Baroque orchestra. This hour long serenata depicts Rome’s return to glory. Arthur Haas conducts the Stony Brook Opera cast and Stony Brook Baroque Players.
 Repeat Performance: February 14 2016, 3:00 PM Recital Hall | Staller Center for the ArtsTickets: $10/$5
Click Here to Purchase Tickets  t0  O Come Chiare e Belle with stage direction by Catherine Turocy. Arthur Haas conducts the Stony Brook Opera cast and Stony Brook Baroque Players.
February 26 and 27, 2016 in Dallas, Texas,  Le Mozart Noir, the Untold Story. Catherine Turocy is the advisor for this new ballet by Valerie Shelton Tabor danced by her company, Contemporary Ballet Dallas, and produced by the Dallas Bach Society. DBS website
Saturday, March 05, 2016  Dance of the Month with Ani Udovicki, The Minuet on Stage

March 16, 2016 in Palm Beach, Florida, Nights in Paris.

Court dances and the chaconne from Gluck’s Armide will be danced by company members Brynt Beitman, Joseph Caruana, Carly Fox Horton, Alexis Silver, Meggi Sweeney Smith and Andrew Tregowith choreography by Catherine Turocy. More news forthcoming.

Program to be announced soon.

April 12, 2016, 7:30 p.m. at Alice Tully Hall with Juilliard415 and Robert Mealy.
Caroline Copeland will be joined with Alexis Silver, Andrew Trego and former NYBDC alum Carlos Fittante in suites of dances from Lully Operas and from Handel’s Terpsichore.
Saturday, April 02, 2016 Dance of the Month with Caroline Copeland
May 7, 2016 Dance of the Month with  Ani Udovicki
 
June 4, 2016 Dance of the Month with Catherine Turocy, Passepied Round O as danced at the time of Alexander Pope
June 8, 2016, Rape of the Lock, a new opera by Deborah Mason with stage direction by Catherine Turocy and choreography by Caroline Copeland.  More information…
June 24-28, 2016.  Santa Barbara Historical Dance Workshop with guest, Ana Yepes. Link to workshop page
June 28-August 3, Hawaii Performing Arts Festival, Go to website
August 7-13, 2016 Catherine Turocy teaches summer course for Nordic Baroque in Sweden.
International Summer Academy of Baroque Dance 2016 – save the dates!

 

photo by Emily Miller

November 6-9 at Haymarket Opera in Chicago:  Amadigi di Gaula by George Frederick Handel.  Sarah Edgar, Associate Director of the NYBDC, is the stage director and choreographer for this inventive production of one of Handel’s “magic” operas fully staged with new costumes and sets. Do not miss this exciting production with period instruments conducted by Craig Trompeter.  For Tickets and more information: http://haymarketopera.org/events.html

 

 

Seth headNovember 11-13 at BAM: You Us We All   Seth Williams, advisor and former dancer/teacher of the NYBDC, is the choreographer for this new opera making its US premiere at BAM Harvey Theater. Part of 2015 Next Wave FestivalShara Worden is the composer, Andrew Ondrejcak is the librettist, designer and stage director and the music is played by B.O.X. (Baroque Orchestration X). For Tickets and more information: Click!

 

November 14, 8pm with The Dallas Bach Society: A Tale of Two Cities: Music in Paris and London. Catherine Turocy, Director of the

Carly Fox Horton, photo by Courtlyn Hanson

Carly Fox Horton, photo by Courtlyn Hanson

NYBDC, with dancers Brynt Beitman, Carly Fox Horton, Alexis Silver and Andrew Trego with a guest appearance of members of the Contemporary Ballet Dallas directed by Valerie Shelton Tabor will join the Dallas Bach Society in music and dance of the 17th and 18th centuries, including music by Handel, Purcell, Lully and Campra for both the ballroom and theater. Location: SMU Meadow School of the Arts, Caruth Auditorium – 6101 Bishop, Dallas TX 75205. For Tickets and more information: Dallas Bach Society

>Cutting Edge Project by Turocy and Goettingen Handel Festival

photo by Juan Garcia

November 20, 7:30pm with Ars Lyrica Houston, Hommage to the Sun King. Catherine Turocy and members of the NYBDC, Brynt Beitman, Carly Fox Horton, Alexis Silver and Andrew Trego celebrate Louis XIV’s 300th anniversary with music and dance in this special “Hommage to the Sun King.” Turocy provides the semi-staging and choreography for Marc Antoine Charpentier’s Les Arts Florissants in a period instrument performance conducted by Matthew Dirst. Location: Zilkha Hall, Hobby Center in Houston  Plan your visit  For Tickets and more information: Please click!

CarolineCopelandColor

photo by H. Nizam

Saturday November 21st, Mainstage 2, Off Broadway Theatre, New Haven, CT. Caroline Copeland performs with Cantata Profana

“From the frou-frou of Poulenc’s raucous and irreverant Bal Masqué to the tristesse of Louis-Nicolas Clerambault’s savagely dramatic solo cantata Médée, CP takes to its feet for a rousing celebration of the great French esprit, joined by the uniquely stunning baroque and modern dance soloist Caroline Copeland. Our first dance collaboration!”
Sunday  November 22nd, REPEAT PERFORMANCE OF ABOVE at Dixon Place, NYC

Sarah LSarah Lysgaard, a student currently pursuing a master’s degree in Art and Art History at San José University will be attending our workshop this year.  Sarah’s dance experience includes over fifteen years of RAD ballet training.  She is now reaching toward a dream of working in a major museum or gallery, with a particular interest in curating performance art.  Sarah’s thesis revolves around dance as a spectacle and as immersive art.   Her enthusiastic outlook is evident as she states, “Art History provides knowledge and understanding of the past, and through it, of the present.  The discipline encourages humanity and sympathy by teaching about other individuals and societies through their visual expression.  I would like to take this level of scholarly degree forwarding by incorporating dance, especially ballet.”  The Santa Barbara Historical Dance Workshop is proud to encourage Sarah in her work.

 

The scholarship committee continues efforts to meet its goal for this year’s scholarships. Although they have raised over $3,000, an additional $1,000 is being sought. Any amount is appreciated. Donations can be made through PayPal. (See our website link on the right sidebar)

We are very grateful to our scholarship donors who have made it possible to award four scholarships this year:

Starr Siegele, Robin Woodard (Shirley Wynne Scholarship), Catherine Turocy (Shirley Wynne and Edith Rosenblatt Scholarships), Pantxoa Etchegoin, Michel and Marie-Jo Dulade-Coclet, Sandra Noll Hammond, Wendy Fuller Mora, Deidre Towers, Catherine Lee, Carol Teten and Marci Hall

We are also thankful to Harriet Berg in advising the committee.

 

Link to June scholarship announcement listing the other recipients

Catherine Turocy Planning Ahead, photo by Catherine Andrako

Catherine Turocy Planning Ahead, photo by Catherine Andrako

Sarah Edgar, Dancer and photo by Jacqueline Chambord

Sarah Edgar, Dancer and photo by Jacqueline Chambord

Renouard Gee in Turocy's 'The Three-Legged Dance,' inspired by Gregorio Lambranzi (1716). Photo by John Mazarak

Renouard Gee in Turocy’s ‘The Three-Legged Dance,’ inspired by Gregorio Lambranzi (1716). Photo by John Mazarak

Photo by Julie Lemberger

Photo by Julie Lemberger, Dancer left to right: Sarah Edgar, Catherine Turocy, Rachel List

Join  Catherine Turocy this summer at the Santa Barbara Historical Dance Weekend and Weekend Plus to discover the many faces of Baroque dance from noble to social to grotesque.  August 20-25, 2015 at UCSB .  Begin the day with a yoga warm-up on the beach and then choose your style.  Are you a maniac for the minuet? A Vanquished lover? Are you curious about the way the Savoy was danced in 18th century France?  …And why all these masks, postures and gestures…is this “early” body language? No matter what level of dance experience, you will be delighted with the fun and challenged intellectually in every muscle of your body.  Click here to read a musician’s experience of one of Turocy’s workshops:The New York Times

ingredients-uncut-for-webWe are all looking forward to Guest Artist Alan Jones teaching at our workshop this year!  He begins with his special one-day intensive Of Banquets and Balls looking at an 18th century cookbook where the recipes are set to dance music popular at the time.  The dances in the book are familiar to historical dancers and the one we will be exploring this year is published with more than one choreography, L’Aimable Vainqueur. 18th century copies of this dance were circulated all over Europe and the colonies.  The recipe for this dance is a mussel base broth. Mussels are in the news in Santa Barbara this year: Flexing Muscles Over Mussels

 

Alan will also be lecturing about the 18th century cookbook and the dances referenced in the recipes.

Going into the late 18th century and early 19th century ballet repertoire, Alan will teach an unknown ballet never seen in the United States, the Pas de Terpsichore.  Click this link if you missed our earlier posting on this Be a Part of History…

Terpsichore by Antonio Canova, 1812

Terpsichore by Antonio Canova, 1812

Click her for the Class Schedule

BNP_Russia copy

Richard Powers has helped initiate a renaissance of interest in historical dance in Russia.  Three years ago, Richard presented his historic dance reconstructions in Moscow, and since then interest among Russian historical dancers has increased to the point where he can no longer accept all of his invitations to teach there.  In the past year Richard has taught five week-long workshops in Russia—in Kirov, Samara, Chelyabinsk and two in Moscow.  There are now over one hundred historical dance organizations in Russia, with about 6,000 members.  Russian historical dance organizations have also translated several of Richard’s papers into Russian.

We are delighted to have him teaching our students at the Santa Barbara Historical Dance Weekend and Weekend Plus this year.

Click to see the Russian evening news report on his work:

I. Shirley Wynne Scholarship, Dancer Ann Pidcock recipient

A new scholarship has been established in the name of Dr. Shirley Wynne (1928-2013). She was a dance historian, teacher, choreographer and stage director who pioneered recreations and reconstructions of Baroque dance in the United States as well as bringing these works to the stage.  Her first production of Jean Philippe Rameau’s Pygmalion in 1969 with conductor, Alan Curtis, may have been the first staging in America.

Ann Pidcock in her own words: Head shot

“I am a professional dancer and yoga teacher based in London. At dance school I was lucky enough to study baroque with Chris Tudor and this began my love for historical dance.
My first job out of dance school was a Baroque Minuet filmed for the Kelvingrove museum in Glasgow. We rehearsed with Philippa Waite and I continued on with Baroque classes to deepen my knowledge. More recently I have danced for the Alan Rickman feature Film, ‘A Little Chaos’.
I now attend Quadrilles Club with Chris and Ellis Rogers at Cecil Sharp house. I find their wealth of knowledge of the dances so inspiring. My hope is to continue to expand my knowledge of the different eras in as most thorough way possible.
Since 2014 I have been in partnership with The Wallace Collection and the Geffrye Museum performing and teaching historical dance.
It has been a wonderful experience as its meant we are able to share some of this wonderful history with younger generations and those interested in other aspects of the era. The enthusiasm I’ve experienced from people’s response is so heartening and leads me to want to spread these dances further and in more detail.
The authentic portrayal of and preservation of technique in these dances is really important and I would love to deepen my knowledge so that I could contribute information of this for future projects.
I feel that there is so much more for me to learn and I am excited at the prospect of having the connections already set up to make sharing this a reality.”
In addition to all of her wonderful qualities, Ann is a British Wheel of Yoga teacher and she will be conducting our sessions of Yoga on the Beach!
The Santa Barbara Historical Dance Workshop is grateful to Robin Woodard and Catherine Turocy, both students of Shirley Wynne, for making this scholarship possible.
II. Scholarship given in the name of Edith Rosenblatt, Dancer/Actress Francesca Bridge-Cicic recipient

From Catherine Turocy: Edith Rosenblatt (1925-2014) was a wonderful elementary school teacher , mother and mother-in-law.  I will always be grateful to my father-in-law, Edward Richman, for bringing Edie into our lives.  Lila Richman had died in 1999 and my own mother had passed away in 1997 and I had no mother of experience to talk to when facing questions of raising two boys. I will always be indebted to Edie for her love, kindness, compassion and common sense. She passed away in August of 2014 and this scholarship is given in her honor to mark this anniversary.

Francesca Bridge-Cicic

Picture of: Francesca Bridge-CicicFrancesca originally trained as a dancer at the Paris Conservatoire and continued her training at Drama Centre London and The Vahktangov Institute Moscow in classical acting. She works as a dancer, choreographer, movement director, director and actor worldwide. Theatre credits include: Company Member / Movement Director, Cannibal Valour Rep Season, Owle Schreame Theatre Company; Rosalind, As You Like It, RADA Studios & Stratford-Upon-Avon summer Shakespeare festival; Juliet, Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare’s Globe; Sonya, Uncle Vanya, Vahktangov Studio Theatre, Moscow and Woman#1, Beckett’s, Play, The White Box Project; Film credits: Anastasia, Caviar II and Amanda, Essays in Love. Other credits include: Venus and Choreographer, Venus & Adonis, Kings Place, London; Solo Dancer, The Significance of Costumed-Bodies – A Study of Tanztheater Wuppertal, Dance Film, Principle Dancer, FlatPack an Opera in Ikea; Katherine, Running Spies, Talk Radio and Director, Hunting Cantata 208, by J.S. Bach, Stockholm Bach Festival. Francesca currently teaches movement for The Court Theatre Training Company.
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III. Work/Study Scholarship, Dancer Althea Fultz, recipient
althea_fultz_photo
Althea will be the “on- location administrative assistant” when she is not busy taking classes at the workshop.  A former student of Regine Astier, she is fluent in French and easily reads Feuillet notation. She is also a multi-era dancer with a wide range of interests.  In her own words: ” Over the course of my life I have been involved in a variety dance genres, whether it be swing dancing, Baroque dance, Ballet, etc. I have developed a great appreciation for the historical aspect of dance; or maybe a better way to express it, is that I have found that the experience and understanding that develops for one type of dance, greatly informs the way one might approach another. One of the greatest intellectual (and physical) gifts anyone ever gave me was my experience with Baroque dance: I was taught not only technique and practicalities, but the notation and history behind the dances. Recently, I was able to decipher the Baroque notation for a dance called Ballo Secondo, as well as learn to dance it. The privilege of looking at and understanding a piece of art that no one has seen for centuries is inexpressibly rewarding. This joy of dance and interest in the intellectual aspect –for lack of a better word— sticks with me, and greatly increases the vim and physical control I have in other forms of dance. Therefore, I would like to take this workshop because, other than simple curiosity (the class on gestures particularly interests me), I feel that experiencing and thinking about a variety of dance forms exponentially increases the quality and enjoyment I find in dancing.”

 

jean-cesar-fenouil-mademoiselle-marie-salle-as-the-french-terpsichore-engraved-by-petitExpressive dance can be taught through technique. I have been exploring 18th century expression in pantomime and dramatic gesture as seen in paintings, porcelains and sculpture as well as the decorative arts.  After reading Judith Rock’s book, Terpsichore at Louis-le-Grand,  I began to pay more attention to concepts of “le Mouvement” and how the physical sense of adjusting the bendings of the joints were linked to descriptions of “movements of the soul.”

In reading descriptions of Marie Sallé in performance, especially the solo works she choreographed for herself, she is often described as having the ability to move the soul. Louis de Cahusac, one of her avid admirers, makes a separate listing for “Le mouvement” and speaks of “movement of the soul” in his book, La danse ancienne et moderne, ou traite historique de la danse. A La Haye (Paris) Chez J Neaulme, 1754, Original copy for sale.

Gestures and attitudes are extremely important in conveying emotion, but it is how one dances through these that gives a period look to 18th century dance which makes it different from modern dance or contemporary ballet.

My class on June 6th will be a two hour exploration into “La Gelosia” … Donal Henahan of The New York Times describes my choreography/performance:

“… there was a splendid chorus in the pit and there can be nothing but admiration for Catherine Turocy, who led her New York Baroque Dance Company in a graceful, often witty, evening of presumably authentic choreography. Miss Turocy, who recreated dances of the period from historical sources, was an expressive Terpsichore in the prologue, which asked her to register all the passions from Love to Jealousy and show intelligence at the same time – not an easy assignment.”

I look forward to sharing my historical insights as well as my experience in performing and then coaching this role over 3 decades.

Location: Mark Morris Dance Center

Time: 3-5

Fee: $16

 

Listen to excerpts of the music online