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Posts Tagged ‘baroque dance’

Catherine Turocy Planning Ahead, photo by Catherine Andrako

Catherine Turocy Planning Ahead, photo by Catherine Andrako

Sarah Edgar, Dancer and photo by Jacqueline Chambord

Sarah Edgar, Dancer and photo by Jacqueline Chambord

Renouard Gee in Turocy's 'The Three-Legged Dance,' inspired by Gregorio Lambranzi (1716). Photo by John Mazarak

Renouard Gee in Turocy’s ‘The Three-Legged Dance,’ inspired by Gregorio Lambranzi (1716). Photo by John Mazarak

Photo by Julie Lemberger

Photo by Julie Lemberger, Dancer left to right: Sarah Edgar, Catherine Turocy, Rachel List

Join  Catherine Turocy this summer at the Santa Barbara Historical Dance Weekend and Weekend Plus to discover the many faces of Baroque dance from noble to social to grotesque.  August 20-25, 2015 at UCSB .  Begin the day with a yoga warm-up on the beach and then choose your style.  Are you a maniac for the minuet? A Vanquished lover? Are you curious about the way the Savoy was danced in 18th century France?  …And why all these masks, postures and gestures…is this “early” body language? No matter what level of dance experience, you will be delighted with the fun and challenged intellectually in every muscle of your body.  Click here to read a musician’s experience of one of Turocy’s workshops:The New York Times

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ingredients-uncut-for-webWe are all looking forward to Guest Artist Alan Jones teaching at our workshop this year!  He begins with his special one-day intensive Of Banquets and Balls looking at an 18th century cookbook where the recipes are set to dance music popular at the time.  The dances in the book are familiar to historical dancers and the one we will be exploring this year is published with more than one choreography, L’Aimable Vainqueur. 18th century copies of this dance were circulated all over Europe and the colonies.  The recipe for this dance is a mussel base broth. Mussels are in the news in Santa Barbara this year: Flexing Muscles Over Mussels

 

Alan will also be lecturing about the 18th century cookbook and the dances referenced in the recipes.

Going into the late 18th century and early 19th century ballet repertoire, Alan will teach an unknown ballet never seen in the United States, the Pas de Terpsichore.  Click this link if you missed our earlier posting on this Be a Part of History…

Terpsichore by Antonio Canova, 1812

Terpsichore by Antonio Canova, 1812

Click her for the Class Schedule

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Catherine Turocy

Catherine Turocy

La Danse by Adolphe -William Bouguereau reflects the importance of dance in French culture.  His portrait of Mademoiselle Martha Hoskier hangs in the museum at Santa Barbara. She is beautifully dressed in the painting and one wonders what she must have looked like while dancing.  Join our faculty and students from the Santa Barbara Historical Dance Weekend Plus as we dance our way through time, linking the eras of the dances and the paintings to give a more physical understanding of the shared aesthetics between popular and high culture.

 

This free event offered at noon is co-sponsored by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and the New York Baroque Dance Company funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. DIRECTIONS

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Sarah Edgar and Justin Coates

Thank you dancers and photographers Amitiva Sarkar, Stefan Gloede, Courtlyn Hanson and Zachary Wu

Caroline and Terry at Operation Sail in Norfolk, Virginia

Olsi Gjeci

Carly Fox

Gregory Youdan and Olsi Gjeci

Gregory Youdan and Meggi Sweeney Smith

Glenda Norcross and Junichi Fukuda

Combattimento with Matthew Buffalo and Alexis Silver

Ballo delle Ingrate

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Catherine Turocy was the co-director and choreographer for an interdisciplinary project at Indiana University which resulted in two performances of “Lully, Glory Without Love?”  Mace Perlman, co-director and author of the spoken dialogue, performed in the production, drawing from his gifts as actor and mime.  Conceived by Allison Calhoun and conducted by Nigel North, the project was a huge success.  Catherine is grateful to Sarah Edgar for assisting her in teaching and coaching the dancers from the Ballet Department who donned Baroque costumes for the first time and performed in both noble and grotesque dances.  Here is the review link with the complete names of the artists: http://blogs.music.indiana.edu/choral/2012/04/25/review-baroque-orchestra-pro-arte-singers-dancers-magically-tell-lullys-story/

photos taken by Sung Lee

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